The odyssey and o brother where art thou comparison essay

Big Dan Teague, the one eyed bible salesman is encountered by the trio in a restaurant (a bust of Homer appears in the background) along the way. Big Dan is a very large man, seen eating at a table alone. He introduces himself to Everett, Pete and Delmar and proposes an enticing business proposition and suggests that they move to "more private environs" out in the country to discuss it. Big Dan's character is a reference to the Cyclops, Polyphemus, in whose cave Odysseus and his men become trapped. Polyphemus is a solitary shepherd who tends a flock of sheep. He becomes enraged when he finds that Odysseus's men have been eating his stores of meat and cheeses and he begins to dine on Odysseus's Big Dan, too, is a shepherd of sorts, who provides his "sheep" with "answers from the book that's got 'em" the Holy Bible. When Big Dan finishes his meal, he reaches up and effortlessly pulls of a giant tree branch and begins to beat poor Delmar with it. Everett, not quite comprehending, asks "What's going on big Dan?" According to Toscana, there is a parallel theme of expected xenia on the part of both our heroes. "Hospitality for the ancient and modern wanderers is central. The bible-selling Cyclops betrays them, echoing a similar concern in Homer."16 Scott Belsky agrees in his article "Odysseus works on an egotistical and faulty belief that the greater world works in alignment with his own worldview [and] he expects the sort of treatment he would afford his own guests."17

The odyssey and o brother where art thou comparison essay

the odyssey and o brother where art thou comparison essay

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