Essay on a niece

As noted above, the Guardsmen are doubles for the rank-and-file fascist collaborators or collabos of his day. Their indifference makes them brutal and dangerous. The most poignant staging of his indifference is undoubtedly that in Antigone's cell. The pathos of the scene inheres in Antigone's appeals to the last face she will see, a face that is blind, brutal, and indifferent. The First Guard, as small-minded as ever, responds unfeelingly to her pleas, rambling about the trivialities of his job. As with the discussion of the party during Antigone's arrest, Anouilh would thus contrast his heroine's high tragedy with the banalities that occupy the guardsmen. The Guards also stand in for the inappropriate spectator, the audience-member who remains inured to the tragic. Thus they make two ironic appearances at the beginning and end of the play, playing cards on the palace steps. As the Chorus remarks in the epilogue, they remain untouched by the tragedy—"it's no skin off their noses." The indifferent members of the rank-and-file would thus stand in an almost edifying contrast to the audience that has undergone, or should have undergone, its catharsis.

Miller is, of course, not alone in his misconceptions about the history of this episode. He was using it to make sense of his own life and times. Popular understandings include many general inaccuracies - for instance, that the witches were burned to death. People condemned as witches in New England were not burned, but hanged, and in the aftermath of the events in Salem, it was generally agreed that none of them had actually been witches at all. Some modern versions also cast the story as having to do with intolerance of difference - a theme that was in the words of Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel at the dedication of the Tercentenary Memorial in Salem in August 1992, for instance - that the accused were people on the fringes that the community tacitly approved of casting out. In fact, most of the people who were accused, convicted, and executed by the court in Salem were remarkable by their very adherence to community norms, many were even fully covenanted members of the church. Such impressions that vary from the historical facts are more likely to come from pressing concerns of the time of the writer.

In 1968, the Milwaukee Art Museum mounted the first retrospective of his art. Twombly had his next retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1979, curated by David Whitney . The artist was later honored by retrospectives at the Kunsthaus Zürich in 1987 (curated by Harald Szeemann ), the Musée National d'Art Moderne , Paris, in 1988, and the Museum of Modern Art , New York, in 1994, with additional venues in Houston , Los Angeles, and Berlin. [32] In 2001, the Menil Collection , the Kunstmuseum Basel , and the National Gallery of Art presented the first exhibition devoted entirely to Twombly's sculpture, assembling sixty-six works created from 1946 to 1998. [33] The European retrospective Cy Twombly: Cycles and Seasons opened at the Tate Modern , London, in June 2008, with subsequent versions at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna in Rome in 2009. At the Tate Modern retrospective, a text read:

Essay on a niece

essay on a niece

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