Compare contrast essay examples college students

There are no hard and fast rules about organizing a comparison/contrast paper, of course. Just be sure that your reader can easily tell what’s going on! Be aware, too, of the placement of your different points. If you are writing a comparison/contrast in service of an argument, keep in mind that the last point you make is the one you are leaving your reader with. For example, if I am trying to argue that Amante is better than Pepper’s, I should end with a contrast that leaves Amante sounding good, rather than with a point of comparison that I have to admit makes Pepper’s look better. If you’ve decided that the differences between the items you’re comparing/contrasting are most important, you’ll want to end with the differences—and vice versa, if the similarities seem most important to you.

Most of the people find it difficult to differentiate a frog from a toad. They normally mix them up. Although they seem so similar in appearance, they certainly have numerous dissimilarities too.
Frogs are found in many different shapes, sizes, colors, and textures. Frogs have smooth, wet skin. They live most of the time in or near water. They have different eye colors including brown, silver, green, gold and red along with different shapes and sizes of pupil. Some of the frogs have sticky padding on their feet while others have webbed feet. It is obvious that not even all the frogs have same qualities.

Compare contrast essay examples college students

compare contrast essay examples college students

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compare contrast essay examples college studentscompare contrast essay examples college studentscompare contrast essay examples college studentscompare contrast essay examples college students